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VII. Complete the following sentences using the idioms studied

 

1. When she bursts out crying-----.

2. The students understood it was no use to try to tease their new teacher as she---.

3. I cant stand her. She is constantly-----.

4. I can fully rely on him. Hell-----.

5. -----, I dont know anything about him.

6. Dont worry, Ill be with you----- by nine p.m.

7. Im so exhausted and tired. This wont do. On Monday Ill-----.

8. Were not going to bargain. The price is final. So-----.

9. Im sorry, I dont remember his name. I just-----.

10. I dont know what to do with this spare time, Im-----.

 

VIII. Compose situations based on your home-reading using as many idioms as possible

 

LESSON 9

to pull ones leg -to deceive a person

 

1. However, this method of criticism was so unconventional that readers believed the critic was pulling their legs, and his boss had to let him go. (E. Caldwell)

2. He remembered Milly asking whether Dr.Hasselbacher ever pulled his leg. (Gr. Greene)

3. "You never pull my leg, do you, Milly?" "No, why?" (Gr. Greene)

 

to make sense - to have sense

to make sense of something - to understand the meaning of something.

 

1. It didnt make sense. People couldnt get ill like this. (D. Cusack)

2. Its rather hard, isnt it, Sid, to make sense of it? (W.S. Maugham)

I dont even know what to do to find out until I can sit down at my desk awhile, look over their insults and try to make some sense for myself. (M. Wilson)

4. The agreement didnt make sense. (I. Murdoch)

Then well get together and go through all this material and try to make some sense of it. (M. Wilson)

 

to be up to something - 1) occupied or busy with 2) privately planning or plotting some scheme

 

1. What have you been up to since I saw you last? (W.S. Maugham)

2. I thought about Anna and about what in the world she could be up to. (I. Murdoch)

3. Hal was the worst of the lot and always up to some devilment. (S. Anderson)

4.Come on, said Miss Handforth, has the cat got your tongue? What have you two been up to there, may I ask? Donald and Felicity were silent. (I. Murdoch)

 

to be up to doing something - to feel up to, to be capable of doing something

 

1. I want air. Are you up to walking? Rather. (J. Galsworthy)

 

to be all in (all done up, all out) - to be tired, tired out, exhausted

 

2. Sit down. He waved her to a stool, himself taking the bench. Im really about all in, you know. Theres no turnpike from the Yukon here. (J. London)

Things are different down here, Miller explained. You dont have to eat dogs. You think different just about the time you are all in. Youve never been all in, so you dont know anything about it. (J. London)

4. She stepped towards him with a movement that was horribly cringing. Youve got me beat, Im all in. You wont make me go back to Frisco? (W.S. Maugham)

to drop in (pop in) - to make a casual visit

 

1. He had developed the habit of dropping in on her sometimes during the week to discuss the latest news about Jan. (D. Cusack)

2. Youll probably get sick of me popping in. (D. Cusack)

3. I just thought Id pop in and ask you if by any chance you wanted a kitten, Miss Blacklock? (A. Christie)

 

to turn on somebody - to face in a hostile manner

 

1. He never felt like a foreigner in Spanish and they didnt really treat him like a foreigner most of the time. Only when they turned on you. They turned on you often, but they always turned on everyone. (E. Hemingway)

2. The big fleshy brunette was busy... He made a timid gesture with his hand. "A cup of tea, please". The brunette turned on him. (A .Sillitoe)

3. If he came home late and she reproached him, he frowned and turned on her in an overbearing way. (D. Lawrence)

4. On the other hand, of course, there was the possibility that Cowperwood might one day turn on him and accuse him of relations with her. (Th. Dreiser)

 

the last straw a slight addition to a burden, task, hardship etc.which makes it unbearable

 

1. The man bounced off the wall and came back with his hands grabbing for Charles throat. This was the last straw. (J. Wain)

2. On top of all my troubles, this was the last straw. (A. Cronin)

3. At the hotel he found Joe, too busy all day with the laundry to have come to him earlier. It was the last straw, but Martin gripped the arms of his chair and talked and listened for half an hour. (J. London)

to let bygones be bygones to forget what happened in the past

 

1. You never liked Harry, did you? he said softly. After the way he behaved to you Simeon cackled. He said: Al, but bygones must be bygones. Thats the spirit for Christmas, isnt it, Lydia? (A.Christie)

2. Irene, he said, let bygones be bygones. (J. Galsworthy)

I want him to come back. If hell do that well let bygones be bygones. After all, weve been married for seventeen years. (W.S. Maugham)

 

to be as pleased as punch very much pleased

 

1. And now the old chap would be as pleased as Punch, for Mrs.Gradman, he knew, had a weak heart, and their son had lost a leg in the war. (J. Galsworthy)

2. and when she said no, going off as pleased as Punch because it was the end of me as far as Negra was concerned.(R. Fox)

 

to put on airs to behave as if one were better than others

 

1. But hes got money, yet, and hes particular about the kind of ship he signs for. Its not for a deck-swab like him to put on airs, Mr. Higginbotham snorted. Particular! Him! (J. London)

2. He was so much afraid of others putting on airs with him that, in order as it were to get in first, he put on such airs as to make everyone think him insufferably conceited. (W.S. Maugham)

3. I do not wish to put on airs but I cannot help feeling that it is seemly in a total stranger to put Mister before my name when he addressed me. (W.S. Maugham)

Dialogue

A: Hi, Mike! Im very glad to see you. Whats happened? You are as pleased as Punch. Why are you smiling so mysteriously? If I didnt know you so well I would think that you are up to something.

B:Well, you are quite right, Mary. Do you remember the man who had promised to help me with my trip to the mountains and then suddenly disappeared?

A:Yes, I remember that he really let you down last year.

B:But you dont know the main thing. I gave him quite a large sum of money for arranging the trip.

A:You dont say so! Why didnt you tell me? And how did you manage to give me such an expensive present for my birthday then? It must have cost you a pretty penny.

B:Oh, it really doesnt matter. And as far as that man is concerned, last year he managed to pull my leg, but this time Ive done the same to him.

A:Oh, Mike, I suppose you should have let bygones be bygones. I think its no use taking vengeance.

B:May be you are right. But somehow or rather I couldnt help doing it. I ran into him in a shop. And you know, I hadnt seen him for a long time as he had been hiding somewhere. So, he pretended he couldnt recognize me. And it was the last straw. I had nearly turned on him in that shop when I came to myself and decided to behave in a more civilized manner.

A: And what is more civilized manner, in your opinion? I suppose, you managed to take yourself in hand, didnt you?

B:Dont worry. I managed to do it all right. As I was all in after my classes I asked that man to go with me to my friend and to give explanations. He tried to put on airs and told me I wouldnt be able to prove anything. But I talked him into going with me.

A:How did you do it, I wonder.

B: The fact is that I have a tape with the record of one of our talks. And I told him if he didnt agree to go I would go to police and tell everything.

A:So, your words did make sense.

B: Yes, they really did. Now Ive got my money and Im going to the mountains next month. Will you go with me?

A: I shall think it over. By the way, Anne asked me to help her with something. Lets drop in on her on our way home.

B: OK. Lets go.

I. Translate into Russian

 

1. What did you make of Miss Carter? said Nan. Not much, said Mor. I found her a bit intimidating. Rather solemn. (I. Murdoch)

2. I have things to say to you, said Bledyard. I have no time to listen to you, said Mor. However, he was rather curious about what Bledyard was up to. (I. Murdoch)

: 2016-06-09

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